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The First Thing That You Need To Figure Out Before Prepping

The First Thing That You Need To Figure Out Before Prepping

When learning about the state of the world as it is (as opposed to what the media presents), many people dive head-first into prepping. They grab onto the first book or podcast or website that they can find and start doing things in an effort to get ready for what many of us are afraid is the inevitable deterioration and decline of our society.

At some point, however, all of us need to step back from our prepping efforts and do some project planning in order to get as “completely” ready as possible. To maximize the benefit of the use of limited time and resource, we need to consider and decide one set of things: What are our prepping priorities? Gaye Levy has this to say about the subject:

“This got me thinking about prepping in general and the various stumbling blocks that many face along the way.  These stumbling blocks may include expense.  Let’s face it, money for food, supplies and gear is an ongoing struggle for almost everyone.  Then there is time.  Learning skills, organizing preps, forming community groups and, for lack of a better word, organizing and inventorying what we have takes a tremendous amount of time, to the exclusion of more pleasant and enjoyable pastimes.

“The pressure to get it all and to do it all is great.

“For some, planning for family safety and security during rough times or a disaster is foremost.  And for that, you will not get an argument from me.  Earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, floods, fires and storms are all things we can relate to.  But what about preparing for a doomsday scenario such as a pandemic, terrorist attack in our own backyard, nuclear holocaust, or a massive world-changing EMP, or global economic collapse? “

She also writes,

“I once asked readers to comment on whether they planned to bug in or bug out if a disaster or crisis were to occur near their home.  The overwhelming answer was “bug in”.  The reasons were many: health concerns, proximity to family members and access to prepping supplies were just a few.

“Let me add another.  Not everyone can afford to own and stock a secondary bug out location.  Yet there are certain survival and prepping websites that will deride their readers for not making the sacrifice to set up an alternate location.  What kind of BS is that?  In a similar manner, certain sites will claim that without 300 pounds of wheat or 10,000 rounds of ammo, you will not survive.

“It is not that those are bad things, but simply that everyone has different needs.

“In spite of the description of preppers portrayed by Nat Geo’s Doomsday Preppers and other reality shows, being prepared is not an all or nothing thing.  You do not need to be extreme, you do not need to run around in camouflage outfits and you do not need to look like a Rambo or Rambette.

“And most of all, if your prepping is imperfect, it is still better than 90% of the population. I say it is time to get over extreme prepping and come to terms with your prepping priorities.  That is what I am doing and you should, too.”

As Levy says, how you us your time and resources when it comes to prepping will depend on the results that you want, what kind of SHTF situation that you think is most likely so that you need to be prepared for it, and your personal preferences. Oh, and you’ll still be better off than most everyone that you know.

Prepping, like starting a family or considering a move out of state or deciding between jobs, is an intensely personal thing. Like so many things in life, how we prep will be determined by our personal values and how we evaluate the coming situation.

The one thing that you should do, however, is you should consider your priorities and then prep. Why? Because we all agree that something is likely to happen in our near future, and it’s better to be prepared than sorry.

What are your prepping priorities? Share them below.

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  • It’s tough on those that live in aging neighborhoods, that now have a mix of rental properties and nearby apartments, especially if it is close to shopping and public transportation and you are counting down to when you can retire. With our economy on the verge of collapse, the door on staying safe is closing. We sold our home and got two acres in the country. I need to get a nice garden in the ground and some chickens. We are on city water, but working on a large capacity cistern. I want a well, but it has to wait, until some other priorities are in place. Stocking MREs, bulk rice, beans, flour, salt, sugar and lots of canned goods. We are in Texas, 30 miles outside of Dallas and I am an Army veteran, so the protection side has been secured against all but helicopter gunships and armored vehicles. I worry more about crime than what’s for dinner. Water is extremely important, and that needs to be shored up pdq. My advice is to get the H— out of the hood. It won’t be safe much longer.

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