Nine Reasons To Consider Fermenting Your Food

Fermenting food used to be a very common thing to do among homesteaders and Americans in general but has fallen off in popularity with the ready availability of other types of foods at grocery stores across the country. However, that trend seems to be changing as people are starting to rediscover the many benefits of fermenting food.

With that in mind, here are nineĀ reasons offered by Gaye Levy as to why you may want to consider fermenting food along with our comments:

  1. Fermentation preserves your food without refrigerating or canning. For purely practical survival reasons, this is a great benefit, and, because it’s easy to ferment food without any special equipment, you may want to decide to make this your food preservation method of choice at your bug out location.
  2. Fermentation adds nutrients. Something about the process of fermentation actually boosts the nutritional value to you.
  3. It adds value to cheap food. If you need to turn some quick cash in a survival situation, fermented food is often worth more than non-fermented food. This means that you can take inexpensive cabbage and turn it into something much more valuable to use for barter.
  4. It helps digestion. Fermentation has the effect of making that food “partially digested.” This can help people with digestive issues to actually be able to eat fermented versions of foods that they cannot otherwise eat.
  5. Fermentation adds good bacteria to your gut (your digestive tract). Recent research has shown that improved gut bacteria in your body can affect an amazing number of things from how clear your skin is, your energy levels, how clearly you think, and even your mood.
  6. It “restores enzymes to your body that are harder to come by the older you get.” Like beneficial gut bacteria, having the proper enzymes in your body can make a huge difference in both your physical and mental health.
  7. Fermentation boosts your immune system. Want to avoid more colds and flues? Eat more fermented food.
  8. Fermentation adds flavor and variety to your diet. Hey, even when you bug out, you can get tired of eating the same thing every day. Fermenting some of your food can help keep it interesting for you. It also has the nice effect of making bland foods, such as cabbage or cucumbers, more appealing to many people.
  9. It helps to get kids to eat healthier. Sometimes fermentation is what it takes to get a kid to eat a healthy food instead of fighting you about it.

With all of these benefits, why would you consider avoiding fermenting? There are a few (such as the smell while doing it), but there are ways to work around it, and the benefits are outstanding. So, as you prepare for disaster situations, you may want to consider packing up fermented food and supplies for fermenting more food at your bug out location.

 
 

  • Mister_Jim

    I’ve been consuming fermented grains for years, great stuff! It has an extremely long shelf life and is usually sold in convenient cases of 24 or 30 cans.

    Consuming too much too quickly does lead to a host of problems, physically, socially and legally, but when consumed in moderation is quite satisfying.

  • Richard M. Boyden

    I had sour dough flap jacks the other day and they were delish. Just need a sour dough culture and can make sour dough bread and other things regularly. I google the recipes, and instructions are all there.

  • ONLYJB1

    Asians take cabbage and bury it. They call it kemchi. (sp) Fermented duck eggs. Yea, I know, yuk! They claim them to be marvelous. Sorry, ain’t gonna try!