Is There A Particular Way That YOU Should Prepare For SHTF?

There are so many opinions about the best way to prepare for a disaster or survival situation. Some people say that you should stockpile food first. Others say that you should set up other food supplies like your own farm plots at an escape location. Some say that you should stockpile guns and ammunition. Others say that you should learn to set traps and get good at archery for both hunting and self-defense. Still others say that you should initially focus on your bug out bag.

And the thing is that all of these people with all of these positions about how to prep are right and wrong.

They are right because those are all great areas to focus on, and, while there probably isn’t enough time in a lifetime to become a master of every single area, with some focused effort, you certainly can become proficient in several areas and masterful at one or two. But they are wrong in that there is no one best way to prepare. Which areas you become proficient in and which one or ones that you master will depend on you and how you think the SHTF will be most likely to happen and how you will most likely survive those scenarios. Backdoorsurvival.com puts it this way:

” I believe that preparedness is a lifestyle and one that you adapt to according to needs, budget, and circumstance.  Prepping needs to be done your way, and in a manner not burdened with fear and trepidation.”

They have a point. Your living situation will have an impact on what resources that you have available. If you live in a more urban area, then access to hunting animals for food or growing food could be more difficult. On the other hand, you may have more ready access to items left over when people have fled the area. I’m not trying to be cynical by mentioning that type of situation. I’m just trying to be realistic.

Also, in an urban area, practicing with guns may not be as easy to arrange (unless you have ready access to a gun range, which isn’t easily available in all areas). On the other hand, ammunition may be easier to come by because people in urban areas tend to be more politically liberal and tend to stay away from guns.

What it comes down to is that you will need to think about your situation as it is now, think about what you think are the most likely survival scenarios, and then decide how you need to prepare. Once you have done that, try to find ways to do a little bit every day. Make preparedness a habit and not a one time event.

How to you make preparedness a habit? Tell us below.

 
 

  • Humbled-B4-Christ

    Best advice is to ….

    1) Remember that the bug out bag is a 72 hour escape plan
    not a long term plan.

    2) Learn at least three different ways to purify water. The
    number of weapons you have will not matter if you are a Yoohoo factory.

    3) Learn how to save, store, and grow seeds. This will allow you to grow food at your
    current location and to start a food plot if you are forced to relocate.

    4) Take an emergency medical class

  • Fr. Bob

    I think we must have a mindset of preparedness. Buy extra, think about what can be saved or grown, balance out things needed for protection with food, water, and other needed items. I save seeds each year and use some the next year, while also purchasing some seeds each year. Each year, I store some seeds for emergencies. I try to keep a three year supply of seeds at all times. I keep a supply of Mylar bags, oxygen absorbers, jars, lids, etc. While canning vegetables and fruit this summer, I also dry canned some additional pasta, rice, beans, and cereals. Every month when I shoot, I replace what I have used and add an extra box. Every year I check my stockpiles and do an inventory. This year I realized that I needed more coffee, flour, toilet paper, and sugar, so I dealt with those shortages, dry canning and storing in Mylar bags. That is what I mean by thinking preparedness. I am sure that I don’t do everything perfect, but I feel like I am continually improving. I will probably never be fully prepared, but I am more prepared than 90% of the people that I usually come into contact with in this state.